Industry

Carbon Tax

Carbon Tax

William Nordhaus has been writing for four decades about climate change and the value of using prices to reduce carbon emissions. His research shows that raising prices through, say, a carbon tax, is a far more effective and efficient way to lower carbon emissions than direct government controls on the quantity of emissions through, say, regulatory limits on cars and power plants.

Extracting CO2 from Air

Extracting CO2 from Air

Addressing climate change isn’t just about moving to cleaner forms of energy anymore. It’s about literally taking out some of the heat-trapping gases already in our skies.

Mexican Economy Stalls With Declines in Oil And Industry Output

Mexican Economy Stalls With Declines in Oil And Industry Output

Gross domestic product declined 0.2 percent from the previous quarter in seasonally adjusted terms, compared with the preliminary 0.1 percent contraction estimate and a 1 percent expansion in the first quarter, Mexico’s national statistics institute reported on Friday. Non-seasonally adjusted GDP rose 2.6 percent from a year earlier.

Would Bill Gates’s proposed robot tax help workers?

Would Bill Gates’s proposed robot tax help workers?

Automation may soon affect even industries and jobs we thought were immune, so what should countries do to prepare for those left jobless and behind? Bill Gates recently offered a simple solution: Tax the use of robots. He argues that such a tax would both “temporarily slow down the spread of automation” and fund social safety net programs for those who lose their jobs to technology.

China & LatinAmerica: US is Losing Tides

China & LatinAmerica: US is Losing Tides

Trouble developing an endogenous manufacturing sector. The U.S. undermined Latin American manufacturing, and then Europe did the same. "With China, it's the same cycle all over again with a different international power,"

Unemployment Rate in the US: Who’s Hiring and Who’s Not

From Bloomberg.com

U.S. employers added 103,000 jobs in March, and the nation’s unemployment rate stayed the same at 4.1 percent, according to data released Friday by the Labor Department. Meanwhile, average hourly pay for workers rose 2.7 percent from a year earlier, to $26.82 from $26.11.

March marked the 90th straight month of U.S. job growth, the longest such streak on record. Still, gains since the 2007–09 recession have been far from evenly spread across industries.

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