International Trade

Rare Metals and US-China Trade War

Rare Metals and US-China Trade War

Rare earth minerals and elements are necessary components of tech and defense tools, including smartphones, LED lights, wind turbines and nuclear rods. And their critical role in modern manufacturing has turned them into the latest lightning rod in the trade war between China and the U.S.

U.S. farm country pins hopes on China trade deal

From Reuters.com

Corn and soybean farmer Lorenda Overman from North Carolina has been selling her crops at a loss and delaying paychecks to her workers since the U.S. trade war with China tanked agriculture prices, and her farm’s debt recently topped $2 million.

If the Trump administration fails to clinch a deal with Beijing soon to end the trade dispute, she says, her operation may have a hard time staying afloat.

“We need some stability, we need some action and we need it now,” Overman, who farms in Goldsboro, said via telephone.

Her desperation reflects the mounting urgency across U.S. farm country over ongoing talks aimed at ending Washington’s trade dispute with China and pulling the U.S. agriculture industry out of its worst crisis since the 1980s. 

U.S. trade negotiators currently locked in talks with their Chinese counterparts are demanding Beijing change the way it does business with the United States, providing more access for U.S. companies, enforcement of intellectual property protection and an end to industrial subsidies.

While the talks mark the closest point yet to an end to the nine-month trade war, the two sides are yet to agree on the core issues which are essential for a deal that would reopen a critical market for U.S. farm goods like soybeans, sorghum and corn-based ethanol.

So far, the American rural heartland that helped carry President Donald Trump to victory in 2016 remains largely supportive of his hard line on trade, saying unfair Chinese practices had to be addressed for longer-term economic gain.

But it has also taken the brunt of the dispute, losing a massive export market. With credit conditions eroding in the agrarian economy and total debt hitting levels unseen for decades, the pain has deepened and patience is wearing thin.

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Trade Deals & Latin America

Trade Deals & Latin America

Chile, Mexico and Peru in March became members of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). The agreement reduces tariffs between 11 countries, including Japan and Canada, which amount to 13% of the global economy.

US Dollar as the Global Currency

US Dollar as the Global Currency

The best thing the dollar has going for it is that its challengers are weak. The euro represents a monetary union, but there’s no central taxing and spending authority. Italy’s recent woes are only the latest challenge to the euro zone’s durability. China is another pretender to the throne. But China’s undemocratic leadership is wary of the openness to global trade and capital flows that having a widely used currency requires. In a December interview with Quartz news site, Eichengreen said, “Every true global currency in the history of the world has been the currency of a democracy or a political republic, as far back as the republican city-states of Venice, Florence, and Genoa in the 14th and 15th centuries.”

What Is A Tariff And Who Pays It?

What Is A Tariff And Who Pays It?

A tariff is a tax on imported goods […] it is almost always paid directly by the importer (usually a domestic firm), and never by the exporting country. Thus, if the US imposes a tariff on Chinese televisions, the duty is paid to the US Customs and Border Protection Service at the border by a US broker representing a US importer.

Emerging Markets May Be Forecasting An Emerging Disaster

Emerging Markets May Be Forecasting An Emerging Disaster

Investors are starting to notice that the stock indexes covering the so-called “Emerging Markets” have been declining steadily.  There can always be many reasons for such a development, but the leading culprits these days are slowing growth in the Chinese economy (and China is a dominant customer of businesses in the developing world) and tariff/trade war concerns between China and the U.S.

Exit Brexit: It's Time For Theresa May To Reverse The U.K.'s Mistake

Exit Brexit: It's Time For Theresa May To Reverse The U.K.'s Mistake

[…] Free trade is essential to economic welfare and growth. […] Leaving the EU will leave the island facing tariffs from its largest trading partner (the non-U.K. EU) and at the economic mercy of the United States.

What Can Businesses Do Among Trade War?

 What Can Businesses Do Among Trade War?

As we’ve all seen countless times over the past several years of frenetic regulation, deregulation, executive orders, and global policy whipsaws, any business’ fortunes can be changed literally overnight if they are not nimble enough to bend and flex with the turbulent forces of legislation, regulation, and litigation.

Are Tax Cuts Making The U.S. Trade Deficit Bigger?

Are Tax Cuts Making The U.S. Trade Deficit Bigger?

So far, President Trump has introduced tariffs on goods imports from the EU, Canada, Mexico and China. All of these countries have retaliated with tariffs of their own, and the EU has lodged a dispute at the World Trade Organisation regarding the tariffs on steel and aluminium. President Trump has just announced tariffs on a further $200bn of Chinese imported goods, and has rejected an offer from the EU to cut tariffs on automobile imports to zero if the U.S. does likewise. Battle is most definitely joined, and President Trump clearly thinks he will win. The U.S. trade deficit should be on its way out.