Markets

The World’s Biggest Electric Vehicle Company Looks Nothing Like Tesla

The World’s Biggest Electric Vehicle Company Looks Nothing Like Tesla

BYD, the company which built the battery in the ’90s cellphone, now produces more Electric Vehicles than anyone—and it wants to sell them to you, soon.

Trade Deals & Latin America

Trade Deals & Latin America

Chile, Mexico and Peru in March became members of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). The agreement reduces tariffs between 11 countries, including Japan and Canada, which amount to 13% of the global economy.

Emerging Markets May Be Forecasting An Emerging Disaster

Emerging Markets May Be Forecasting An Emerging Disaster

Investors are starting to notice that the stock indexes covering the so-called “Emerging Markets” have been declining steadily.  There can always be many reasons for such a development, but the leading culprits these days are slowing growth in the Chinese economy (and China is a dominant customer of businesses in the developing world) and tariff/trade war concerns between China and the U.S.

Coca-Cola & the Cannabis Market

Coca-Cola & the Cannabis Market

Coca-Cola says it’s monitoring the nascent industry and is interested in drinks infused with CBD -- the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that treats pain but doesn’t get you high. The Atlanta-based soft drinks maker is in talks with Canadian marijuana producer Aurora Cannabis to develop the beverages.

Electric Mercedes opens German assault on Tesla

Electric Mercedes opens German assault on Tesla

The Mercedes EQC - whose launch program in Stockholm features yoga in a direct appeal to the Millennials who have flocked to Tesla - is the first production model under the carmaker’s electric EQ sub-brand. It will be closely followed by similarly hyped debuts for BMW and Audi.

Harley-Davidson Swerves Amid Trump's Tariff War

Harley-Davidson Swerves Amid Trump's Tariff War

The iconic motorcycle manufacturer disclosed in an SEC filing Monday that it is moving production of motorcycles for the European market offshore because of the retaliatory tariffs imposed by the European Union after President Trump decided to tax imports of European steel and aluminum.

What Is The Effect On Stocks Of Higher Interest Rates Combined With Higher Oil Prices?

What Is The Effect On Stocks Of Higher Interest Rates Combined With Higher Oil Prices?

It's the Federal Reserve Board that holds the most sway over the direction of interest rates and it's the free markets that determine the price of oil. What kind of pull does one have on the other, to such an extent that they seem to trade in tandem?

Most Americans Don't Invest In Stocks For Retirement, But Still Fear Next Market Downturn

Most Americans Don't Invest In Stocks For Retirement, But Still Fear Next Market Downturn

Less than one-third (31%) of middle-income boomers feel prepared for retirement and lower-income boomers feel even less prepared. So what is driving this lack of preparedness and uneasiness?

Latin America: a New Market for Financial Technology Companies

From Latinvex.com

Latin America’s financial technology (fintech) market is growing and companies like Germany-based Mambu are seeking a piece of the action.

Mambu is mainly targeting Brazil and Mexico, followed by Colombia and Argentina and to some extent Chile.

“There’s a lot of appetite for fintechs – there’s a positive wave of new technologies,” says Edgardo Torres-Caballero, Miami-based Managing Director for the Americas at Mambu.  

The advantage companies like Mambu offer is that they can help a bank launch a greenfield digital operation in six months or less, Torres says.

In addition to big investments going into the sector, many of Mambu clients are going through first and second rounds of investments.

According to Statista, there will be more than $100 billion in fintech transactions this year in three Latin American markets alone -- Brazil, Mexico and Argentina.

Latin America accounts for a majority of fintech startups that were established between 2014 and 2016, according to data quoted by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

There are more than 700 startups, both local- and foreign financed, with $186 million in venture capital investment, as of 2016, IDB says.

Of those 85 are foreign companies, according to Finnovista.

“Mexico, Brazil and Colombia position themselves as the main Latin American destinations for foreign Fintech startups mainly from Europe and the United States,” it says. “The segments of Payments and Remittances, Lending, Scoring, Identity and Fraud and Enterprise Technologies for Financial Institutions lead the offer of foreign Fintech in the region.”

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